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Okay, thought I'd ask some questions about infrequent track days with a GT86 but retaining as a daily driver. This is aimed at the occasional track driver.

My limited experience I've gained since owning the GT86 are as follows.

I need to keep weight of the car down, especially unstrung weight. I've read that unsprung weight can be worth almost 5 times sprung weight so making wheels, tyres, brakes etc. lighter can make a greater difference than reducing exhaust, interior etc. - although This doesn't include any rotational variables.

I'm therefore thinking I should get some proper track day wheels and tyres and wondered if getting 16" or 17" are best, and what size / width tyres? Also, what make/model tyres suit the GT86. Perhaps the Toyo R888 or Yokohama Parada, Silverstone FTZ etc.

When looking at the braking, should I just replace the standard items with better pads, fluid, hoses/pipes, or does the GT86 need bigger 4/6/8 pot calipers and bigger discs? What about the rear brakes, because they should be less used due to front engined, rear wheel drive.

Suspension: do we really need coil-overs to get the best out of the suspension or does the Tein/Eibach lowered springs offer a cheap alternative, and does it actually make the car handle much better with coil overs ?

I'm also interested in down-force and some track cars seem to add a big rear spoiler, but does this make a significant difference?

Power: how much difference does a good exhaust and ECU change/remap make? A well know GT86/BRZ dealer says 25bhp is to be expected and sounds good, but how does that compare with other option? Is their exhaust the best you can expect? I've heard about Vortex exhausts that give better economy, performance and sounds, but has anyone tried them on the GT86?

Induction: what's the best option for increasing air flow?

Supercharger/Turbocharger: Completely different topic.

Any advice appreciated with my current hobby!
 

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Well 1st off are you sure you want to start playing with stuff? Things like tyres and brakes are a good idea, I'll get onto the rest as I go down.

herit86 said:
I'm therefore thinking I should get some proper track day wheels and tyres and wondered if getting 16" or 17" are best, and what size / width tyres? Also, what make/model tyres suit the GT86. Perhaps the Toyo R888 or Yokohama Parada, Silverstone FTZ etc.
R888 always get good reviews and would be my choice. If you can get 16s that will fit then that would probably be best due to weight, and the tyres would be cheaper too. Just be wary about having to sticky a tyre as we know that slicks have caused oil starvation, no-one knows quite what the limits for the oil in the pan is, so are trackday tyres like those mentioned going to cause problems?? Who knows, but unlikely I would have thought.

herit86 said:
When looking at the braking, should I just replace the standard items with better pads, fluid, hoses/pipes, or does the GT86 need bigger 4/6/8 pot calipers and bigger discs? What about the rear brakes, because they should be less used due to front engined, rear wheel drive.
Hoses only improve feel, doesn't actually aid breaking. Some like the benefits, thats down to preference. IMO go with pads, they make a huge difference. If you're really hardcore then go for a whole brake setup but it will not be cheap. Rear brakes don't need to be done on a brake upgrade but if you can match pads all round then why wouldn't you
You could upgrade the discs but IME OEM discs are good and a pad change will suffice.

herit86 said:
Suspension: do we really need coil-overs to get the best out of the suspension or does the Tein/Eibach lowered springs offer a cheap alternative, and does it actually make the car handle much better with coil overs ?
This is a minefield.... The standard suspension is good as a mix of road and track. Fact. If you want lowered then I would go Eibach springs, Tein will be no better but more expensive, typical of JDM tuners that I've been used to for years. Now with coilovers (generally), fixed ones will lower the car and if they're stiff enough for track will be very stiff on the road. If they're adjustable, then you will need to know how to set up the car and adjust it for track and then again for road driving. This will need to be done well or you can ruin the handling of the car!!! I've said before, aftermarket isn't always better than OEM and you can spend £££ and make the car worse.

herit86 said:
Power: how much difference does a good exhaust and ECU change/remap make? A well know GT86/BRZ dealer says 25bhp is to be expected and sounds good, but how does that compare with other option? Is their exhaust the best you can expect? I've heard about Vortex exhausts that give better economy, performance and sounds, but has anyone tried them on the GT86?
A good exhaust will give similar gains, doen't matter what brand. Do Vortex even make one for the 86? Even if they did, I'd go with Miltek who know what they're doing. But no one company is going to be significantly better than the rest IMO. If you're interested about power, have a read over here:
FT86 ECU/Engine forum. Plenty of info about ECU tunes, intakes, exhausts. It seems that bolt ons will net you about 25hp. Just remeber if you get an intake from A (says 5hp gain) and anexhaust from B (10hp gain) then the parts may not be best suited for each other, this is emphasised if you start getting headers etc. It's best to go for parts suited for each other. You can't go far wrong from Litchfield IMO and you won't get cheaper either as you'll have to import!

herit86 said:
Induction: what's the best option for increasing air flow?
Most intakes at the moment are rubbish. Panel filter in the stock box is probably best. Read the post on the aFe Takeda intake on here somewhere, lots of informative posts on what's good/bad and why. If you wanted a kit, then the aFe is what I'd have and will put you back over £200.
 

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Money spent on track day tuition might end up giving you the biggest return on your investment; 'as is' I'd say the 86 is a good occasional track day car.

The other thing to think about is how far you want to go and what you want to spend. I suspect modding heavily for track day use is probably a real case of diminishing returns the further you go.

So where is the sweet spot and what should the priorities be;
- better pads, fluids and lines will give your brakes more track resilience and you more confidence
- some more power
- some track day wheels/rubber

Investment in aero is probably a waste of money, and I'd spend money on suspension, only as your game improves. Big brake kit when you have big power otherwise it is overkill.

I think making big overall weight savings on the 86 will require radical work as a lot of it is paper thin already. Seats would be an obvious target but racing seats will be a pain in the arse for road use. Yes, be mindful of unsprung weight. Could you get 100kg of an 86? Yes, but it would be a bit spartan indoors!

My car is a track day toy and I'll really only do road miles to and from track events ( and it is insured on a scheme for that type of use.) Even so, I'm a big fan of 'arrive and drive' ( I'll change wheels but that is about it ) and having some road comfort, like a good hifi.

My strategy;
Increase power, LPP, then supercharge
Keep weight flat or slightly down, loosing unsprung if the opportunity arises ( my Rays will be about 16lbs for example)
Adapt brakes for track use then move to BBK as power increases significantly. Same strategy for suspension.
Track day wheels and rubber
Keep taking tuition
 

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Some really good advice in this thread.




In a lot of cases the car will be more capable than the driver for the casual track day user. I know that's definitely the case in my situation and hence why i bought a cheap MR2 so that I don't have to worry about those moments when i run out of talent



I would definitely encourage you to look at your brakes if you notice they are giving up after a few hot laps, and apart from the above i'd also advise to look at some sort of cooling\ducting as it will definitely help.
 

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You 'should' be OK with R888 or A048 road legal track type tyres, as they're road legal tyres the car should be capable of dealing with the loads they can put on things, generally speaking. Especially a car so clearly aimed at this market :)

Saving unspring weight from wheels and tyres will make a good difference in driving feel for sure, but I would echo what is written above and say tuition is a good start to get the most out of what is there, before go-faster bits are added. You will have to accept all the turbo-nutter cars passing you on open pitlane days on the straights, trying to match them blow for blow just wont happen, but if you are in it for fun rather than competition being the best you can be personally is the best first step :)

Also be sure to check the levels on everything before and after a track outing, including brake fluid, coolant and oil, together with brake pads etc, to make sure your trip home and time on track does not do any damage :)
 

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I would honestly take the care out bone stock and see how you get on. If you've got a lot of track experience then you can highlight any issues that may need addressing such as brakes and that kind of stuff. I'd also do a wet and a dry day if you can (though I understand you can't book the weather).

Things like different tyres make a big difference. Coilovers make a huge difference but you won't like it on the road. Also you need to do it stock so you can get a ballpark for the handling charateristics.


If you've not got lots of experience then I'd recommend tuition so you can at least get the basics right and build from there.


As other's have said, messing about with downfarce probably won't reap much in the way of benefits unless perhaps you are spending most of your time lapping Spa and the like. Also the car isn't really quick enough.


I've done trackdays for twelve years, worked for a trackday company and have raced a bit too.
 

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Ultimately you can't have the best of both worlds with a single car. A car setup for the track isn't going to be particularly nice (or safe) on the public roads. A car setup for the public roads is going to suffer somewhat on the track, to some degree. These comments are specifically around suspension configuration. Big brakes and power (to some degree) are fine in both scenarios.

Before looking at solutions, what problem are you trying to fix? Are you at the limit of the stock car, or do you just have money burning a hole in your pocket? Unfortunately the whole culture of the aftermarket will have to believing that you need parts a,b,c,d,x,y and z but in reality just one of those parts could make 90% of the difference you may be seeking.

I predict the first couple of chassis changes I will make to my car will be some better pads (most likely DS2500's) and possibly a thicker rear anti-roll bar. I personally don't like the chassis balance as it understeers more than I am used to. May possibly look at some stiffer bushes on the rear, specifically around the lateral suspension arms and/or entire sub-frame mounting to further loosen the rear up - but one thing at a time!
 

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No idea how good a driver you are but the single biggest difference between cars on a trackday is talent..........

My mate races a Lotus Elise and he is fairly good. The pro driver he shares a car with is 3 secs a lap faster on Brands GP circuit.

Sod silly nano adjustments
 
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