New Brakes Still have protective material??! - Toyota GT 86 Forums UK
 
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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 18th May 2020, 16:30 Thread Starter
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New Brakes Still have protective material??!

Hello, I am recently a new owner of a GT86 and am loving the car. I decided to do some work on the brakes as they needed changing and decided to get some new EBC brake disc's and Pad's. I managed to fit them myself following a few youtube videos and forums explaining how to do it. It all went fairly smoothly with only a few minor problems (broken bolt holding the front caliper etc.) which i managed to fix.
Brakes are working great and more responsive than previously but not too harsh, however i have noticed the rear disc's coating hasn't been removed from braking in comparison to the front brakes, in some places it has but in others not which is making me assume the pad is not connecting evenly on the disc?


Is the normal or are the brakes not making contact properly? Any help would be greatly appreciated
I have attached pictures of the front and back for comparison.
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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 18th May 2020, 16:50
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How many miles have you done since the install? I would assume that your front brakes do most of the work, and the rears don't apply as much pressure under normal driving, so perhaps it just takes longer for them to clear the coating. It generally takes a good few miles for the brake pads to bed into the disc, so it might just take a bit more time for that coating to get worn off.

If it's still looking like that after a longer period, then I'd investigate the calipers to make sure the slider pins haven't jammed. The slider pins are what the section of your caliper that holds the piston bolts into on the main carrier (I think with 14mm bolts) - they allow that part of the caliper to move back and forth against the carrier (bolted to the hub). They can get stuck with age which means either not compressing fully, leading to uneven application and wear. However, you can sometimes feel that through the pedal, so if it all feels good, they're probably OK.

Give it a few hundred miles and then check again would be my advice, assuming that they are at least operating as they should.

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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 18th May 2020, 18:23 Thread Starter
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I've been driving to and from work for about a week but its only a 6 mile journey all in all. I had assumed what you mentioned that the back brakes don't engage as much during normal driving i had just thought they might have removed the coating by now.
All feels good in the pedal to me i haven't noticed any changes or problems. I'll give it a couple more weeks as you suggested to see if its any different. If the slider pins are getting stuck are they easy to fix/ get new parts for or does that mean a whole new caliper?

Thanks for your help!
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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 18th May 2020, 18:31
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As above, I would give it a couple of hundred miles before being concerned, and keep applying the brakes regularly and gently at first. I did EBC brakes all round and remember there was a very good bedding in process detailed in the instructions. I also filed / fettled the pad backing plates where they engage in the caliper as they were very tight to install and I wanted them to be able to move easily as one of the previous ones had stuck and worn very unevenly and overheated. Only when you're confident that all the pads are fully contacting (few hundred miles?) you can start to lean on them and really bed them in.
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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 18th May 2020, 18:50 Thread Starter
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Thanks for the advice i'm probably just being paranoid after installing them myself. I remember reading the instructions around bedding with the pads but not much about the discs. Thanks for all the help!
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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 19th May 2020, 07:53
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this is all new to me and I have to say I'm a bit skeptic. You have to run in your brake pads for a few hundred miles? I'll spell out my procedure: in the first miles with the new brakes I do a few brake checks to see whether they work well and they work symmetrically. I'm sure that puts some heat in them. And that is all. So I just googled it and google tells me I'm doing right: https://www.autozone.com/diy/brakes/bedding-brakes. So my brake check is actually the same as bedding in.

I do the same thing with tyres really. The stickers are removed while driving in the first few miles.

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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 19th May 2020, 10:16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joev54 View Post
If the slider pins are getting stuck are they easy to fix/ get new parts for or does that mean a whole new caliper?
No. You can buy new slider pins fairly cheaply if needed, but in most cases, they just need a clean up and a dab of new grease. If you're already managed to change your own discs and pads, then servicing the pins should be easy...good video here which describes what I'm talking about, hopefully it should look familiar to you as the caliper design of most cars is very similar.


But I don't think that's your issue here. Just give it a bit more time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MovesWithClouds View Post
this is all new to me and I have to say I'm a bit skeptic. You have to run in your brake pads for a few hundred miles? I'll spell out my procedure: in the first miles with the new brakes I do a few brake checks to see whether they work well and they work symmetrically. I'm sure that puts some heat in them. And that is all. So I just googled it and google tells me I'm doing right: https://www.autozone.com/diy/brakes/bedding-brakes. So my brake check is actually the same as bedding in.

I do the same thing with tyres really. The stickers are removed while driving in the first few miles.
It generally takes a few hundred miles of normal driving before your pads and discs are fully bedded in. But yes, you can speed up the process by doing what you say. I tend to do the same with new pads - I take the car out, get the brakes hot, then I do some repeated hard braking from high speed (but not actually coming to a full stop). Then let the brakes cool.

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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 19th May 2020, 13:44
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Actually if properly bedded in, matters also what type of pads are and how bedding is done. With some hardcore track oriented pads it's possible that they will never get upto (high) working temps in light braking of daily driving, and rather opposite, extra daily driven mileage after trackday in few days will scrape bedded layer off, resulting in possibly more wear and those loud squeals at traffic lights , until one rebeds them again (via eg. several repetitious hard slowdowns on eg. highway).
Just driving mileage (with according bedding from "normal" braking alongside that driving) will work for street oriented pads with lesser working temps they are easy warmup to, to enable transferring pad material as layer onto rotors.
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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 19th May 2020, 14:11
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I'd distinguish between the first stage of 'scrubbing off pad material onto the disks' which I believe can be done quickly, and 'wearing off the pads so they fit the peculiarities of the disk better'. The contact area should be the full area of the pad and maybe there are cases where the pad first needs to wear , but I'm thinking that you have a problem then in the setup. The problem may be mitigated by wearing the pads a bit.
Mind you that is just my thinking here -not experienced advice.

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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 19th May 2020, 21:05
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Follow the bed in procedure. You should have got instructions with the pads.

I am having new Ferodo DS2500 pads and discs fitted tomorrow. I have AP 4 pot fronts on two piece 330mm discs. I know that I will need to spend a good 20 minutes doing increasingly hard stops from 100-60mph tomorrow night to bed them in. I do it until I can smell them and the discs turn blue showing some pad transference.

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