Which 16 Inch Tyres - Page 5 - Toyota GT 86 Forums UK
 1Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #41 of 49 (permalink) Old 9th December 2020, 10:39 Thread Starter
Expert
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 1,846
Looking for modest performers here https://alltyretests.com/uniroyal-ra...3-test-review/
I was surprised Avons don't perform all that well on wet and dry handling. At least according to this test.

Moves With Rowds
MovesWithClouds is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #42 of 49 (permalink) Old 9th December 2020, 21:05
Expert
 
Tony H's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Kent
Posts: 1,189
Quote:
Originally Posted by MovesWithClouds View Post
Looking for modest performers here https://alltyretests.com/uniroyal-ra...3-test-review/
I was surprised Avons don't perform all that well on wet and dry handling. At least according to this test.
Well, the Avons are 2nd to best in aquaplaning and above average at wet handling, while heck, even the Primacy HPs are good enough in the dry! Plus, I thought you were after less grip, which would mean picking a tyre that was slow on a dry slalom!

But I always have to wonder, how can they test such a wide range of tyres under identical conditions in the dry? Temperatures at least vary greatly over the course of one day, let alone more. That might explain how Contis often do very well in these German tests, but ah, I see now that test winner Uniroyal is now owned by Conti...
Tony H is offline  
post #43 of 49 (permalink) Old 10th December 2020, 15:06 Thread Starter
Expert
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 1,846
Dry handling is not that important. Progressiveness and low grip in the wet is, but also forward kinetic grip. HP has low grip but weak progressiveness. The 4 is reasonable on grip and good on progressiveness in the wet but kinetic friction is too high. I suspect wet braking is a measure for that.
Avon scores in the range of Nokian Line which I know and like.



Every page uses a different reference and the measurements are very limited so it is very hard to compare using this site but the Kumho Ecsta HS51 is listed on both

https://alltyretests.com/michelin-primacy-4/ and https://alltyretests.com/michelin-primacy-3/ which I know well . The 3 brakes only a little better than Kumho Ecsta while the 4 brakes a lot better. That fits with my experience.

Moves With Rowds
MovesWithClouds is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #44 of 49 (permalink) Old 4th January 2021, 18:30
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 3
I've just come across this thread and it seems I'm after almost the same thing: progressive slip in the wet and dry with reasonably low speeds. The most fun I've had has been on winter tires (xice3, 205/55/16, 94H) in the snow, wet, and dry. I almost want a tire that behaves more or less like these but all year round...



I've been on the lookout for some nokian lines and found a set of 195/55/16 (84V). I'm a bit naive about all the variables here, but wondering if anyone has any suggestions for a (general) effect of tire size and sidewall height on progressiveness.



For example, all things equal, is a 55 aspect tire more progressive? I've read that higher sidewall will also tend to not maintain slides as easily, which I can see being linked to progressiveness, but would this potentially be overboard with a 84 load index?



All things equal, would a 195 width tire have lower limits but similar progressiveness to a 205 tire?



Appreciate any advice and I'm happy to report back after I've tested out my purchase!
Octopus_arm is offline  
post #45 of 49 (permalink) Old 4th January 2021, 21:34 Thread Starter
Expert
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 1,846
My Nokian winter tyres were great for 'forceful driving' but they won't last a winter that way.

Mostly more sidewall means the steering is also less direct and it is a suspension upgrade on bad roads.
A tyre with more sidewall can flex more which means you have to be more brutal to unstick it and to keep it unstuck. That is not the same as progressiveness. A lower load factor probably adds to that.
Maybe narrower tyres are more progressive but that would be a minor factor. Type of tyre is more important. Nokian Line was indeed progressive.

Moves With Rowds
MovesWithClouds is offline  
post #46 of 49 (permalink) Old 5th January 2021, 10:56
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by MovesWithClouds View Post
My Nokian winter tyres were great for 'forceful driving' but they won't last a winter that way.

Mostly more sidewall means the steering is also less direct and it is a suspension upgrade on bad roads.
A tyre with more sidewall can flex more which means you have to be more brutal to unstick it and to keep it unstuck. That is not the same as progressiveness. A lower load factor probably adds to that.
Maybe narrower tyres are more progressive but that would be a minor factor. Type of tyre is more important. Nokian Line was indeed progressive.

Brilliant! Thanks so much for the guidance--incredibly helpful. I get your point that sidewall =/= progressiveness, but it sounds like it would play into how easily/quickly a slide recovers.



In case it is remotely helpful for you as well, I got advice from another forum about Achilles 868 (which I cannot get where I live).
Octopus_arm is offline  
post #47 of 49 (permalink) Old 5th January 2021, 13:45 Thread Starter
Expert
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 1,846
Yes recovery from a slide is the 'keeping it unstuck' bit. More meat recovers easier.
I notice that Achilles is an all season. i don't know the brand but that type of tyre could indeed be a smart move in general. I've never tried it.

With cheaper brands my concern is that it is easier to lose the car because of two weaknesses. Progressiveness means you get a warning near edge of grip. Kinetic grip is about how hard you slide once you get unstuck. Primacy HP was weak on both fronts: you didn't know where the edge of grip is on a cold rainy day and once it got sliding the resistance was pretty low so you didn't know if you'd be able to recover it(in time). If you slide deliberately that is less of a problem but when you're caught by surprise on a slippery spot it does matter. Primacy 4 is the opposite: it rarely catches you by surprise and it usually stops the slide by itself. It may trample a lot while at it but that is a nuisance, not a safety issue.


[edit] ah for clarity: all seasons suffer less from these two weaknesses, regardless of brand. Because they are more winter tyreish.

Moves With Rowds
MovesWithClouds is offline  
post #48 of 49 (permalink) Old 5th January 2021, 17:28
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 3
I wonder about the primacy 4: do you reckon going to a narrower size or thinner sidewall would reduce the tendency for the slide to stop by itself? Or perhaps the characteristics would change in other unintended ways


I've seen the suggestion to go to cheap and/or hard all seasons, but, like you, I worry it's a bit of a crapshoot and the risk would be low limits, but no feedback and no progressiveness. I wonder if a good path would be good all seasons but in a relatively narrow size with a thinner sidewall (45-50).



By the way, re-reading the thread here, I thought it might be useful for you that the Yokohama e70 dBs are apparently just as bad as the primacy in the wet (perhaps you've seen this: https://www.ft86club.com/forums/showthread.php?t=54762).







Quote:
Originally Posted by MovesWithClouds View Post
Yes recovery from a slide is the 'keeping it unstuck' bit. More meat recovers easier.
I notice that Achilles is an all season. i don't know the brand but that type of tyre could indeed be a smart move in general. I've never tried it.

With cheaper brands my concern is that it is easier to lose the car because of two weaknesses. Progressiveness means you get a warning near edge of grip. Kinetic grip is about how hard you slide once you get unstuck. Primacy HP was weak on both fronts: you didn't know where the edge of grip is on a cold rainy day and once it got sliding the resistance was pretty low so you didn't know if you'd be able to recover it(in time). If you slide deliberately that is less of a problem but when you're caught by surprise on a slippery spot it does matter. Primacy 4 is the opposite: it rarely catches you by surprise and it usually stops the slide by itself. It may trample a lot while at it but that is a nuisance, not a safety issue.


[edit] ah for clarity: all seasons suffer less from these two weaknesses, regardless of brand. Because they are more winter tyreish.
Octopus_arm is offline  
post #49 of 49 (permalink) Old 6th January 2021, 11:18 Thread Starter
Expert
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 1,846
I see no mention of the Yoko e70 in that thread you point to. I don't know what to think of it yet.
Summarizing the main lines for me are: Tyre width matters for aquaplaning and tyre temperature on track. I don't bother with it. Sidewall matters for stability. Good for back roads, a bit for driftability. With a stiffer tyre you can prolong the drift for longer. Compound and profile matter for behaviour near and beyond grip limit.

Other effects are lower order. If you want a progressive tyre , it's tyre brand and type which matter. It's possible the budget all-seasons are good fun, but that is speculation on my part. It's budget summer tyres I worry about, not all-seasons.
So for primacy 4: pick that if you want to go for safety and cost over all. More sidewall means even more safety. For me that was a bit much.

Moves With Rowds
MovesWithClouds is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome